Feeling unsettled yet?

Here follows the opening remarks of long-time colleague, friend and fellow photographer, Peter McKenzie at the occasion of the opening of my exhibition ‘Unsettled: 100 Years War of Resistance by Xhosa Against Boer and British’ at the KZNSA Gallery in Durban, KwaZulu-Natal on the 13th of May, 2015.

Cedric’s work is for me a form of re-appropriation of the contentious issue land. The creative act of engaging with a skewed notion of land ownership which makes it vulnerable to exploitation and abuse by power is reigned in and harnessed to serve the real needs transformation and racial equality. It renders land with its due, considerable heft. Continue reading

Apartheid Archive Project

In 2011 I produced a photographic exhibition for the Apartheid Archive Project http://www.apartheidarchive.org

This project aims to archive accounts of living under apartheid, or recollections of the effects of apartheid by those who lived this experience or where adversely affected by apartheid. The submissions are entirely voluntary and can be made online at the above address, as can the existing ones be read online.

 

My submission is as follows;

 

My first encounter with apartheid happened very early, long before I could call it by its name. I was four when uncle Lawrence came to stay with us in our little cottage in Hluhluwe village, one of many men who sojourned with us whilst passing through or working in the area. He had come to build a school, and I was elated, because this evidently meant that, unlike the rest of my siblings, I would have the good fortune to remain at home, and not be sent off to some distant place to school. I was wrong. Continue reading

Karima Effendi Interviews Cedric Nunn for Joburg Photo Harari

June 2013

 

Karima Effendi (KE): When it comes to training and professional development, how important is the idea of exchange as demonstrated in the Joburg Photo Harare masterclass?

 

Cedric Nunn (CN): Exchange is key to the development of life in general, and in our specific regional context where countries were separated by ideological differences, fostering connections through exchange is critical. We need to be made aware of our commonalities and shared interests.

If you think of Zimbabwe, there are “perceived” differences between us (South Africa and Zimbabwe). We have a particular understanding of the processes that happened in Zimbabwe, which comes from these perceived differences. Continue reading

Interview used in the project ‘Social Landscapes’.

Social Landscapes, also called ‘Transitions’, is a French/South Africa Season project. The interview by Jeanne Fouchet here is published in the book ‘Transitions’.

ITV Cedric Nunn

Cedric Nunn uses photography to remind South Africa of the unsuccessful resistance of its indigenous people to the confiscation of their land.  Nunn’s photographs not only keep alive the tragic history of land-thefts, but also show how indigenous people remain dispossessed and excluded from their ancestral homes, as the exploitation of the region by global mining and agricultural interests continues unabated. Cedric Nunn took his photography series in the Eastern Cape Province, Grahamstown, Peddie, and Hogsback.

Q.  You have always been a socially engaged photographer.  How does the series you completed for this project continue that work?

The project I chose for this series was one I was intending to do independently for myself, and indeed, it has just been begun and is in need of a lot more work towards completion. It dovetailed with the “Social Landscape” project and therefore it was imperative to begin with it. Continue reading

‘Bringing Forth Our Own World’

‘Bringing Forth Our Own World’

 

Living in the glut of images that make up the media that encompasses our consciousness and unconsciousness, it is uncomfortably clear to some of us the extent to which the world’s we are presented with have little resemblance to the one’s we inhabit.

Every so often, this glaring fact smacks me in the face and I’m brought up short and left wondering how on earth it is to be corrected. The simple answer is to go out and make the images that more truthfully reflect the world we know. But as any practicing professional would know, it’s easier said then done. Continue reading

Johannesburg’s Rebirth

The period following the release of political prisoners and the un-banning of political organizations in 1990 and the advent of democracy in 1994 brought unprecedented changes to the country in general and the heart of the city of Johannesburg in particular.

The inner-city of Johannesburg was designed by and for the exclusive use of white South Africans. Blacks were to visit by day from their far-flung townships to labour for the white owned and run economy. Continue reading