Call and Response Book Launch

I have just recently come across this transcription from the launch of Call and Response at the Book Lounge in Cape Town in 2012, so some time ago, but a detailed and important conversation between my interlocutor UWC Historian Patricia Hayes and myself.

Again, I post this for the sake of documentation, and to make such conversations readily available to researchers and the like. Enjoy!

Book launch of Cedric Nunn, Call and Response

Conversation between Cedric Nunn and Patricia Hayes, introduced by Bronwyn Law-Viljoen.

The Book Lounge, Cape Town

12 June 2012

Transcribed by Bianca van Laun

Bronwyn: Thank you everybody for coming out on this blustery Cape Town evening. I’m Bronwyn Law-Viljoen, I’m the editor of Fourthwall Books which is the South African publisher of Cedric Nunn: Call and Response. I’m not going to say anything at the end so I’ll just say thank you now to Mervin and everyone else at Love Books for once again being so hospitable and hosting the book launch

Mervin: You mean the Book Lounge

Bronwyn: Oh sorry. (Laughs) I’m so sorry. The last one was at Love Books in Joburg. Book Lounge, sorry Mervin my apologies. The Book Lounge. Thank you. About two years ago I was approached by, I had known Cedric’s work obviously for a long time and so I was absolutely delighted when Ralph Seippel who is Cedric’s gallerist in Johannesburg approached Fourthwall Books with the idea of doing this publication and the German publishers. I think Cedric, he looks so young, I always think Cedric looks so young but he’s been around for ages. (Laughter). Young and sexy says George Hallett.   But Cedric has been at the cold face of South African photography since the 80s, since the 1980s.  He entered the fray at a critical juncture not only in the history of South Africa but in the history of photography, South African photography and I think very quickly established himself as a photographer with a deep sense of justice and at the same time a deep compassion and humanity for his subjects and for the environments in which they found themselves.  And that has always been the thing that has stood out for me and I think probably for many of you who know Cedric ‘s work is his desire to get off the beaten track and although he has been at some of the momentous events and has photographed some of the critical moments in South Africa history, he’s also been to the quiet places, to the places where most of us don’t go, to find the people that he’s really interested in and to whom he feels, with whom he feels a deep affinity. So his photography evinces an enormous generosity and compassion. Patricia is going to be Cedric’s interlocutor tonight. I met Patricia a couple of years ago on the occasion of your publication of John Liebenberg’s book. Patricia is a historian by training and her research and her work is in history but she has obviously developed a very keen sense of the relationship of the visual to history, and of history to the visual in South Africa. She teaches history at UWC and has been involved in very interesting projects about South African photography, to do with South African photography, so I think she’s a very worthy conversationalist and questioner tonight. So thank you very much Patricia for agreeing to talk to Cedric, and over to both of you. Continue reading

Advertisements

Transitions

SourceURL:file://localhost/Cedric/Blog/Articles/Transitions.doc

The publication Transitions is one of number of outcomes of an agreement known as the France South Africa Season. This exercise, which took place between 2012 and 2013, was aimed at strengthening relations between the two countries. In 2012 South Africa hosted France and vice versa In 2013. It took place in different areas of each country, covered a wide range of activities in different sectors, including arts and culture, business and investment, science and technology, tourism, sports and education. Continue reading

Karima Effendi Interviews Cedric Nunn for Joburg Photo Harari

June 2013

 

Karima Effendi (KE): When it comes to training and professional development, how important is the idea of exchange as demonstrated in the Joburg Photo Harare masterclass?

 

Cedric Nunn (CN): Exchange is key to the development of life in general, and in our specific regional context where countries were separated by ideological differences, fostering connections through exchange is critical. We need to be made aware of our commonalities and shared interests.

If you think of Zimbabwe, there are “perceived” differences between us (South Africa and Zimbabwe). We have a particular understanding of the processes that happened in Zimbabwe, which comes from these perceived differences. Continue reading

Interview used in the project ‘Social Landscapes’.

Social Landscapes, also called ‘Transitions’, is a French/South Africa Season project. The interview by Jeanne Fouchet here is published in the book ‘Transitions’.

ITV Cedric Nunn

Cedric Nunn uses photography to remind South Africa of the unsuccessful resistance of its indigenous people to the confiscation of their land.  Nunn’s photographs not only keep alive the tragic history of land-thefts, but also show how indigenous people remain dispossessed and excluded from their ancestral homes, as the exploitation of the region by global mining and agricultural interests continues unabated. Cedric Nunn took his photography series in the Eastern Cape Province, Grahamstown, Peddie, and Hogsback.

Q.  You have always been a socially engaged photographer.  How does the series you completed for this project continue that work?

The project I chose for this series was one I was intending to do independently for myself, and indeed, it has just been begun and is in need of a lot more work towards completion. It dovetailed with the “Social Landscape” project and therefore it was imperative to begin with it. Continue reading

On Pornography

Recently a good friend’s family was implicated in a scandal involving pornography. I have felt a great deal of empathy for this family, the children of the couple, my friend and the person implicated as well. This has caused me to do some thinking of this phenomenon we call pornography, how it comes about, its place in our world, and the ways in which it affects us amongst other things.

What do we know about pornography? That its taboo, somehow dirty, implicated in prostitution, implicated in child abuse, the abuse of women, implicated in degenerating our morals and ethics, that it is responsible for a great deal of internet traffic, that it is big business etc. How much of the above is true is of course open to speculation because it’s mostly just that, speculation. And this is so because pornography is essentially underground, meaning that it is beyond the pale and therefore not open to investigation. It is elusive. Continue reading

‘Bringing Forth Our Own World’

‘Bringing Forth Our Own World’

 

Living in the glut of images that make up the media that encompasses our consciousness and unconsciousness, it is uncomfortably clear to some of us the extent to which the world’s we are presented with have little resemblance to the one’s we inhabit.

Every so often, this glaring fact smacks me in the face and I’m brought up short and left wondering how on earth it is to be corrected. The simple answer is to go out and make the images that more truthfully reflect the world we know. But as any practicing professional would know, it’s easier said then done. Continue reading

Digital glut

Digital Glut

 

I was one of the first to embrace the digital age. When the writing was clearly on the wall, I figured that as a photographer with close on to a hundred thousand negatives, I needed to digitize them and proceeded to do so, buying a Mac in 1996 and a dedicated negative scanner. This was rapidly followed by a web site. My reasoning to go the scanner route first was that because there was still so much of development needed to take place in getting camera’s ‘up to speed’, it made sense to start out on getting my existing archive digitized. Continue reading