Feeling unsettled yet?

Here follows the opening remarks of long-time colleague, friend and fellow photographer, Peter McKenzie at the occasion of the opening of my exhibition ‘Unsettled: 100 Years War of Resistance by Xhosa Against Boer and British’ at the KZNSA Gallery in Durban, KwaZulu-Natal on the 13th of May, 2015.

Cedric’s work is for me a form of re-appropriation of the contentious issue land. The creative act of engaging with a skewed notion of land ownership which makes it vulnerable to exploitation and abuse by power is reigned in and harnessed to serve the real needs transformation and racial equality. It renders land with its due, considerable heft. Continue reading

Grahamstown in focus: Cedric Nunn

Grahamstown in focus: Cedric Nunn

Grocott’s Mail

Photographer Cedric Nunn sees things differently. What’s the well-known lensman’s take on Grahamstown and the Eastern Cape, Sue Maclennan asks.

There’s one regret Cedric Nunn carries with him as he leaves Grahamstown this week: it’s that during his long and successful photographic career, this is the first time he’s managed to work extensively in the Eastern Cape. Continue reading

Opening Address Unsettled: 100 Years of War by Cedric Nunn

Opening Address

Unsettled: 100 Years of War by Cedric Nunn

Wits Art Museum

10 March 2015

 

Rory Bester

Head: History of Art and Heritage Studies

Wits School of Arts

 

Good evening ladies and gentlemen, friends and colleagues. Welcome

to the opening of Unsettled: 100 Years of War by Cedric Nunn. Continue reading

Photographing KwaZulu-Natal

This article was published in the December 2011 issue of Umlando which is the heritage publication of Ethekwini Municipality, to coincide with the showing of my exhibition ‘Convergence’ at the KwaMuhle Museum, which falls under the municipality. Follows:

The exhibition ‘Convergence’ consists of two bodies of work from my photographic career; ‘The Hidden Years’ and ‘In Camera’. ‘The Hidden Years’, consists of a series of images which show aspects of society in KwaZulu-Natal, which I felt was ignored or given little attention. The exhibition was shown at the KwaMuhle Museum in 1995, and the entire show was acquired by the museum at the time. It has been my great pleasure to have this work in KwaMuhle’s collection since it has been given exceptional exposure through the museum.

‘In Camera’ was produced in conjunction with the Apartheid Archive Study Project (www.apartheidarchive.org) in 2009, and looks at South African society, focusing particularly on KwaZulu-Natal and elements of apartheid which continue to manifest in our society to this day. Continue reading

Chromatic Portraits

Axe Du Sud, a French production company, have produced a documentary on ten South African photographers, myself included, the film was shown on Arte in Europe on 30November. Here is a very short clip from the documentary;

http://boutique.arte.tv/f10080-afrique_sud_portraits_chromatiques

People Live Here

This is an essay I wrote for the Msunduzi Museum magazine ‘Ulwazi’, related to an exhibition of my photographs which they hosted and showed in their gallery space. The photographs were commissioned by the Pietermaritzburg Agency for Community and Social  Action (PACSA), a rare commission in today’s South Africa;

In about May 2014 the Pietermaritzburg Agency for Community and Social Action (PACSA) approached me with a request to participate in their annual Film Festival and produce an exhibition of still photographs, which would frame the festival, based on their theme of ‘People Live Here’.

 

We discussed the broad streams or thematic aspects, such as income generation; services such as electricity, water and sanitation; gender, youth, food and health, and based on these considerations around which PACSA delivered its services, the focus of the project evolved. I had carte blanche in who and where I photographed, which is every documentary photographers dream. PACSA were keen for the photographs to reflect more then their actual work and rather the context in which their work emerged and evolved. Continue reading

Photography and Democracy

An interview from about two years ago, for the project Photography and Democracy, and courtesy Eva-Lotta Jannsen. Photography and Democracy has many other such interviews with South African photographers and is an important site to visit to learn and find out more about the views of South African photographers, especially regarding the concept and their views around democracy.

http://photographyanddemocracy.com/?portfolio=cedric-nunn-2

Of Migrants, Minions and Magnates

I begin the title of this presentation with migrants because in a sense that’s my story, my own personal experience of the world, and it would seem, that of so many other South Africans, and indeed other citizens of the world.

Migrancy, a defining experience worldwide, has been such for millennia, and seems especially so in our present globalised world. The rapid shifts in demographics play havoc with social planning and its various constructs. Mirrored to these shifting human movements, is that of rapidly shifting economies and finances, with finances in particular having become virtual. How we experience this ‘virtuality’, is all too real however. Continue reading

On War Porn

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I put off completing this post for several months, while wars raged around the globe, and war photographers and journalists were taken hostage in countries like Syria, held for ransom and a few decapitated live on camera. One reason is I felt torn that perhaps I was being too facetious about a matter of life and death. I’ve thought long and hard about it and returned to my original feelings on the matter, which are as follows:

 

Well, there I go again on that P word and concept. But if you think about it, it most definitely concerns images, so I need to give it my best shot. A disclaimer is that I was singularly unsuccessful in my brief stint in the said profession. I did make a few memorable images in the Natal war, and promptly had a moral crises when realizing that I along with other unsavoury characters was benefiting from the death of many innocents, and worse feeding a culture of fear. Continue reading